Mental Health, Youth and Sexual Violence: An FAQ

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By Ontario Coalition of Rape Crisis Centres, White Ribbon Campaign, and OPHEA

What is mental health, and why is it especially important to young people?

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines mental health as a “state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community”. Mental health problems can include panic and anxiety, depression and other mood problems, psychosis, eating problems and other emotional, coping or addiction problems.

It is estimated that around 20% of the world’s children and adolescents have mental health problems. About half of mental disorders begin before the age of 14. Without support, mental health problems can have a significant impact on a young person’s ability to engage with and succeed in their studies: “young people with mental health disorders are at great risk for dropping out of school”. As they grow older, additional challenges can accumulate, with “diminished career options arising from leaving school prematurely” and an overall “effect on productivity” and well-being.

Challenges also exist in providing helpful responses to young people dealing with mental health problems. Children’s Mental Health Ontario shares, for example, that:

  • 28% of students report not knowing where to turn when they wanted to talk to someone about mental health¹
  • Black youth are significantly under-represented in mental health and treatment-oriented services and over represented in containment-focused facilities²
  • First Nations youth die by suicide about 5 to 6 times more often than non-Aboriginal youth
  • LGBTQ youth face approximately 14 times the risk of suicide and substance abuse than their heterosexual peers.

Continue reading

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Hamilton Feminist Zine Fair – Fourth Edition

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The Hamilton Feminist Zine Fair, organized by SACHA, celebrates and creates spaces for marginalized groups to have discussions about feminism through do-it-yourself publishing.

We’re aiming to create an accessible event that gives a platform to those often under-represented in zine culture.

HFZF will have people tabling, selling and chatting about their zines, and a six hour zine challenge.

When: Saturday, May 12th from 10am to 4pm
Where: Hamilton Public Library, Central Library – 4th Floor. 55 York Blvd, Hamilton ON

COST!
HFZF is FREE to attend. There will be zines for sale so if you do plan to go home with some new treats it’s a good idea to bring some money.

BOOK A TABLE!
Cost! A half table costs ten dollars. Book your table here – https://hfzf2018.brownpapertickets.com/

Free tables available. Email crickett@sacha.ca to book a free table OR if you are unable to book online through Brown Paper Tickets.

WHAT’S A ZINE?
A zine is a self-published book, magazine, or comic. Anyone can make a zine – using low-cost methods like collage and photocopying – to create a space for their words, ideas, images, and more. Not having to rely on traditional publishing allows for non-mainstream voices to be heard!

THE PROBLEMS WITH ‘THE PROBLEM WITH FEMINISM’

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By James Dee

I don’t even know where to begin here, other than to express profound disappointment that we are doing this yet again. For those of you who do not follow The Hamilton Spectator, yesterday an Op-Ed was published called ‘The Problem with Feminism‘. If you don’t want to read it the TLDNR version is essentially: “feminism was once important, but now it is bad”, followed by a list of reasons that are all entirely not things. I cannot believe that we are doing this again, Hamilton Spectator.

I cannot believe that in 2017 there are still people who willfully misrepresent what feminism is, which is the belief that humans of all gender identities and expressions are deserving of equal rights, respect and treatment. Being critical of ‘the construct of feminism’ as a whole is not brave or original, it is oppressive and disgusting. Full stop. Continue reading

SACHA’s 2017 Annual General Meeting

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You’re invited to SACHA’s Annual General Meeting.
 
Please let us know that you plan to attend by contacting Maria at 905.525.4573 x221 or sacha@sacha.ca.
 
Our business meeting will be from 5pm to 6:15pm. The meeting is a chance for us to review our year, welcome new or returning management committee volunteers, and for SACHA members to make larger decisions about the orgnization.
 
After the meeting at 6:30pm, wonderful Jiaqing Wilson-Yang will be speaking about Granting Inclusion: Trans Women and Sexual Violence from 6:30pm to 7:15pm.
 
Come for the entire event or just one part!
 
ACCESSIBILITY
The YWCA Senior’s Centre Auditorium is entirely accessible. There are gendered washrooms with stalls inside the Senior’s Centre and large single stalled non-gendered washrooms on the first floor and in the basement.
 
Thank you to Katie Raso for designing this year’s AGM report.

Celebrating 40 Years of OCRCC

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OCRCC-is-Turning-40-posterOCRCC – Ontario’s coalition of English-speaking sexual assault centres – is turning 40 this year!

THIS IS A BIG DEAL!

When SACHA was founded in 1975 it was by a group of survivors with no funding who wanted to change the world. When patriarchy, oppression, and colonialism are still so powerful and present in our daily lives, this anniversary is reason to CELEBRATE!

What we have planned…

  • 6:30pm Meet and Greet
  • 7:00pm Greetings
  • 7:15pm Comedian Elvira Kurt
  • 8:00pm Presentations and Awards
  • 8:15-9:00pm Social

When: Wednesday, June 21st, 2017
Where: Ramada Hotel and Suites – 300 Jarvis Street, Toronto ON
Please RSVP to Nicole (ocrcccoordinator@hotmail.com), JoAnne (directorwsac@vianet.ca), or Michelle (michelle@sascsl.ca).

 

You Rock. It’s True.

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IMG_2213We were so excited to be invited to 5th Ancaster Girl Guides last fall to help them with their Say No To Violence Challenge.  We had amazing discussions and did activities to think about what they want in their relationships and how they can stand up for their friends.

They also came up with a very long list of what they look for in friends! The Guides then made beautiful art for survivors at SACHA, with their messages of support and love.

Thank you to these amazing young women for sharing to much compassion and creativity!

May is Sexual Violence Prevention Month.