Interview with SACHA’s Finn

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Finn has been doing a work placement at SACHA since January.

Finn’s working on finishing their high school degree and is constantly on the lookout for more puppies to cuddle.

They kindly allowed us to interview them for our blog:

Why did you choose a placement with SACHA – an intersectional feminist collective?

I chose SACHA because I knew it was an intersectional feminist organization. I am an intersectional feminist and thought it would be a good way to improve my knowledge and also just help me to improve on being a better feminist which is very important to me.

I follow feminism rather heavily and want to work to better myself and people around me using intersectionality as much as I can! I also felt like it would be empowering knowing I can help people who have been in situations similar to my own, and it definitely is empowering, it’s a really good feeling to have. Overall, I guess I can say I really love SACHA’s values and I knew I wanted to be a part of the work that this wonderful place does!

What did you know about SACHA before your placement compared with what you know now?

Before I started my placement at SACHA, I thought this was a place for survivors to get counselling and advocacy from and that’s about it. I didn’t realize there were events like Take Back the Night, Chocolate Fest, International Women’s Day, and other events that SACHA organizes.

I also didn’t realize that they allowed more than just women to work here or to get service here. I thought I was going to have to stay closeted and be hush hush about being an Agender person, but it’s a super accepting environment and people use my correct pronouns. I also learned about the history of SACHA more. I didn’t know it was started by survivors and serves folks of all genders! Like seriously how cool is that?

What was your biggest learning at SACHA?

My biggest learning would definitely have to be how important self-care is. Sometimes I answer an office call and the person is in crisis. This work is new to me and I find it overwhelming sometimes.

I remind myself that I want to be there for the person in crisis and I have a team of SACHA workers who have my back and I can get support from after the call.  I also remember that it’s OK to cry about hard stuff. Crying doesn’t make me weak.

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[Image description: Picture of a magnet that says ‘cry positive space’.] Thanks to Sexual Assault Centre London for making us this awesome button!

Sometimes crisis calls are really hard and I had to learn that I can’t always immediately meet a caller’s need. In that moment I try to step away and reassure myself I did the best I could to my full potential and then start the self care! While I’m here I listen to music, drink plenty of tea, and make sure to have puppy video ready!

In a couple of words, how would you describe SACHA as a workplace?

 I would describe SACHA as accepting, dedicated, and a very mellow atmosphere.

Before you worked at SACHA, how were you learning and having convos about feminism and consent?

Before my placement at SACHA, I didn’t really have anyone to teach me about feminism or consent except for myself. I surround myself with a very tiny circle of friends and they all look at things in similar ways that I do. So consent and feminism were always very positive to talk about. I would research about feminism for hours on end and scroll through tumblr to try to find the intersectional blogs and posts because I had no idea where to begin or who to ask. I have very different values and beliefs from my family; they’re a little more conservative than I am so I didn’t bother asking them about it. I think I was in grade 10 or 11 when I learned more about consent and found out what it really was.

Working with SACHA was an amazing experience. I feel like it helped me better myself as a feminist and as a person. I will always be grateful for having this opportunity.

Finn’s top three Instagram and Tumblr accounts:

Instagram:

Tumblr:

 

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